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First satellite launched by Sri Lankans

ITN News Editor
By ITN News Editor April 18, 2019 18:52

First satellite launched by Sri Lankans

Sri Lanka’s first satellite designed by two Sri Lankan Engineering students was taken to the International Space Station early this morning.  It was launched into space at 2.16 am today, marking Sri Lanka’s entry into the global space age.

RAAVANA-1 which is a cube-seized miniature satellite and Sri Lanka’s first research satellite. It was designed and built at the Kyushu Institute of Technology in Japan by Sri Lankan research engineers Tharindu Dayaratne and Dulani Chamika, from the Arthur C Clarke Institute, Moratuwa. ‘Raavana 1’ was designed to accomplish five missions. Dulani Chamika has studied electronic mechanical Engineering technology in Thailand and thereafter joined the Arthur C. Clarke Institute in Moratuwa. Tharindu Dayaratne has followedthe Electric and Electronic Engineering degree at the Peradeniya University and then begun serving as a Research Engineer at the Arthur C. Clarke Centre.

The statellite was handed over to NASA through the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. It is reported that the research statellite could capture photographs of Sri Lanka and its surrounding countries while orbiting the Earth five times.

The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket and its unmanned Cygnus spacecraft launched into the space from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s East Shore, kicking off a two-day voyage to the space station.

The satellite is expected to fulfill five missions including the capturing of pictures of Sri Lanka and its surrounding regions.

The Raavana-1 measuring 11.3 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm, and weighing around 1.05 kg is expected to orbit 400 km away from earth. It will have a minimum lifespan of one and half years.

Its camera mission is to take pictures of Sri Lanka and its neighbouring countries. Its Lora Demonstration Mission is to validate the module/to be used to data download next satellites. The Altitude Determination and Control Mission of ‘Ravaana 1’ involves the team trying to reduce the angular velocity of the satellite, using magnetic torques.

 

ITN News Editor
By ITN News Editor April 18, 2019 18:52